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LindaHilton

Linda Hilton

Reader, Writer, Merciless Reviewer and Incurable Romantic

Currently reading

Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right's Stealth Plan for America
Nancy MacLean
Progress: 134/574 pages
Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy
Christopher L. Hayes
Progress: 17/304 pages
The Secular Scripture: A Study of the Structure of Romance
Northrop Frye
Progress: 43/200 pages
Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right
Arlie Russell Hochschild
Progress: 96/454 pages
Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
Ibram X. Kendi
Progress: 22/750 pages
All the President's Men
Carl Bernstein, Bob Woodward
Progress: 73/383 pages
Women's Gothic and Romantic Fiction: A Reference Guide (American Popular Culture)
Kay Mussell
Progress: 17/157 pages
The Looking-Glass Portrait
Linda Hilton
Really Neat Rocks: A casual introduction to the rocks & gems of Arizona and the lapidary arts
Linda Hilton
Progress: 61/61 pages
Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith
Jon Krakauer

Reading progress update: I've read 61 out of 236 pages. DNF, you wall-banger, you!

Breaking the Rules - Kitty Wilson

All prior updates, in order from first to last.

 

http://lindahilton.booklikes.com/post/1770638/so-far-disappointing

 

http://lindahilton.booklikes.com/post/1770803/reading-progress-update-i-ve-read-19-out-of-236-pages

 

http://lindahilton.booklikes.com/post/1770829/reading-progress-update-i-ve-read-19-out-of-236-pages

 

http://lindahilton.booklikes.com/post/1770848/reading-progress-update-i-ve-read-25-out-of-236-pages

 

http://lindahilton.booklikes.com/post/1770892/reading-progress-update-i-ve-read-30-out-of-236-pages

 

http://lindahilton.booklikes.com/post/1770900/reading-progress-update-i-ve-read-43-out-of-236-pages

 

http://lindahilton.booklikes.com/post/1771458/reading-progress-update-i-ve-read-57-out-of-236-pages

 

Disclosure:  I accessed this book from my public library's ebook collection.  I do not know the author nor have I ever communicated with her about this book or any other matter.  I am an author of historical and contemporary romance and non-fiction.

 

Breaking the Rules: The Cornish Village School just got thrown against the metaphorical wall.

 

Breaking her rule against dates from the village, Rosy takes Matt to the local pub for Sunday dinner.  I've previously mentioned the Big Miz conversation, which ends up going nowhere.  She doesn't even give the issue another thought.  Is Angelina really Matt's girlfriend or isn't she?  What is their relationship? Does Rosy even want to know what their relationship is?  If not, why not? What changed her mind?

 

More important, what will everyone in town think about now that they've all seen Rosy out in public with this new guy?  This is The Rule for her, that has directed all of her social life.  Suddenly, she throws it all to the winds.  Why?

 

Okay, that's bad enough.  There's no motivation given for this woman to be breaking her sacred Rule already.  No explanation is forthcoming at all.

 

And then she gets drunk.

 

She got drunk the night before and had such a hangover that she was getting ready to barf when Matt called on her that morning.  But here she is, not only breaking her rule and going out in local public with a guy she hardly knows, but getting drunk with him.

 

 

Getting drunk, in public, with a man she hardly knows, breaking her solemn rule.  My eyes nearly rolled into the kitchen.

 

There was also the issue of the word "woah," which my fingers have severe difficulty typing because the correct spelling is "whoa," but even a grammar dragon like me isn't going to report the book to Amazon for that misspelling.

 

And then, at the end of Chapter Eight, as Matt is thinking back on all the things they did in the pub that day . . .

 

 

 

One doesn't pluck a harpsichord.  The harpsichord plucks itself, but the player plays the keyboard.  That was the point at which Breaking the Rules went sailing into the metaphorical wall.

 

Never mind that Matt has made Rosy an absolute paragon, to the point I was afraid I'd have to check my blood sugar. 

 

 

This isn't a bad book, and I am quite certain there are many readers out there who will enjoy it.  That's what makes me sad.  This is a poorly written book that could have been made a whole lot better with good editing.  I don't care that the point of view hops willynilly from Rosy to Matt to the omniscient narrator to . . . whatever.  I do care that the character of Rosy is inconsistent and insufferably shallow.  I do care that the plot -- what there is of it so far -- hinges on a misunderstanding that neither of the characters then pays any attention to.  I do care that everything is told and nothing is shown, that I can't picture anything in my imagination because the author offers so little description.

 

I do care that a so-called publisher put this book out and didn't have the expertise on staff to turn this into a cute bit of entertainment.

 

DNF at approximately 25%, no stars.