339 Followers
265 Following
LindaHilton

Linda Hilton

Reader, Writer, Merciless Reviewer and Incurable Romantic

Currently reading

Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right's Stealth Plan for America
Nancy MacLean
Progress: 134/574 pages
Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy
Christopher L. Hayes
Progress: 17/304 pages
Anatomy of Criticism: Four Essays
Northrop Frye
Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right
Arlie Russell Hochschild
Progress: 96/454 pages
Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
Ibram X. Kendi
Progress: 22/750 pages
All the President's Men
Carl Bernstein, Bob Woodward
Progress: 73/383 pages
Women's Gothic and Romantic Fiction: A Reference Guide (American Popular Culture)
Kay Mussell
Progress: 17/157 pages
The Looking-Glass Portrait
Linda Hilton
Really Neat Rocks: A casual introduction to the rocks & gems of Arizona and the lapidary arts
Linda Hilton
Progress: 61/61 pages
Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith
Jon Krakauer

16 Tasks of the Festive Season - Square #2 - Guy Fawkes Day

Blind Ambition: The White House Years - John W. Dean

A book about political treason.

 

I've had the paperback edition of John Dean's book for a bazillion years, started it several times, never got very far.  Then it showed up as Kindle bargain -- either free or 99 cents or something, so I grabbed it with the intention of reading bits and pieces when I had the chance.  I take the Kindle with me when I run errands because I never know when I'll get stuck in a line.

 

I had such a line at the post office a week or so before Christmas.  I always use the self-service kiosk when I can, and that particular day there were three people ahead of me, none of whom had ever used the kiosk.  By the time they had finished and it was my turn, I was completely engrossed in Blind Ambition.

 

The events were fairly familiar.  The rise and fall of Richard Nixon occurred during my adult lifetime, so there were no real surprises here.  But I have to say I found Dean's writing much more engaging than Woodward and Bernstein in All the President's Men, which I'm reading more or less concurrently.  As one of the actual participants in the Watergate cover-up, Dean doesn't spare himself, and certainly isn't particular kind to most of the others in the Nixon White House.

 

For inside background information on Watergate, Dean's account is probably one of the best and earliest.  Very much recommended.