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LindaHilton

Linda Hilton

Reader, Writer, Merciless Reviewer and Incurable Romantic

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Sick to my stomach

— feeling bad smell
Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.'s American Heroes: Robert Smalls, the Boat Thief - Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Patrick Faricy

In 1851, when Robert was 12 years old, his master sent him to Charleston to work. He was rented out to different employers. All the money Robert earned went into Henry McKee’s pocket.

 

Robert first found work as a waiter in a hotel. He later became a lamplighter for the city. Afterward, he toiled on the Charleston Harbor docks. There, he moved materials on and off boats.

 

He was a fast learner and a hard worker. He progressed in many types of jobs. His employers liked him because he always did good work.

 

What Robert liked most was working on transport ships. He received training as a ship pilot. But slave pilots were not honored with that title. Instead, they were called wheelmen.

Harris, Kenneth. The Sea Adventures of Robert Smalls (African American Civil War Heroes Book 1) . Seed Educational Supplements. Kindle Edition.

 

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When he was 12, Smalls' master sent him to Charleston to hire out as a laborer, with the money paid to his master. The youth first worked in a hotel, then became a lamplighter on Charleston's streets. In his teen years, his love of the sea led him to find work on Charleston's docks and wharves. Smalls was a stevedore (dockworker), a rigger, a sail maker—and eventually worked his way up to become a wheelman, more or less a pilot, though slaves were not honored by that title. As a result, he was very knowledgeable about Charleston harbor.[3]

 

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Smalls) 

[3]  Henig, Gerald, "The Unbeatable Mr. Smalls", America's Civil War, March 2007.

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Neither Wikipedia, Henig, nor Kennedy is cited in Harris's work.