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LindaHilton

Linda Hilton

Reader, Writer, Merciless Reviewer and Incurable Romantic

Currently reading

Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right's Stealth Plan for America
Nancy MacLean
Progress: 134/574 pages
The Secular Scripture: A Study of the Structure of Romance
Northrop Frye
Progress: 43/200 pages
All the President's Men
Carl Bernstein, Bob Woodward
Progress: 73/383 pages
Women's Gothic and Romantic Fiction: A Reference Guide (American Popular Culture)
Kay Mussell
Progress: 17/157 pages
The Looking-Glass Portrait
Linda Hilton
Really Neat Rocks: A casual introduction to the rocks & gems of Arizona and the lapidary arts
Linda Hilton
Progress: 61/61 pages
Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith
Jon Krakauer

Reading progress update: I've read 114 out of 256 pages.

— feeling sleep
The Daughter of Sherlock Holmes: A Mystery (The Daughter of Sherlock Holmes Mysteries) - Leonard Goldberg

Overhyped drivel.

 

Amazon listing says the book is set 1914; book itself suggests 1910.

 

Sign of the Four is set -- according to Wikipedia -- in 1888, at least 22 years before this book.  Why in heavens name would Dr. Watson, Sr., think the dog Toby from the earlier book was still alive 22 years later?  Had he learned nothing of basic common knowledge in all his years?

 

No mention of technological advances: motor cars, telephones, electric lights.  Pah!

 

UPDATE:  Pg 176 -- mention of telephone for first time.

 

 

It's not even an interesting mystery, and recalls too much of Sign of the Four.

 

I'll finish it -- skimming, I presume -- for Bingo, but this is yet another dud.

 

Fortunately, the book I've chosen for my last remaining square is NOT a dud.  ;-)

 

 

UPDATE:  Pg 133 reference to "recent" election of H. H. Asquith as PM, so setting is 1910.  That the publisher Macmillan could get it wrong on the Amazon listing is telling.

 

UPDATE:  Pg 134 reference to use of the loo. OED apparently gives first published use of the term to James Joyce in 1922, though of course spoken vernacular may have been earlier.

 

Gack.