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LindaHilton

Linda Hilton

Reader, Writer, Merciless Reviewer and Incurable Romantic

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I think I'm going to be sick, and give up

Surrender Ma'Lady: 1856 Western Historical Romance Novel - Willow Fae von Wicken

(Review in progress.  More to come.)

Disclaimer:  I obtained the Kindle edition of this book when it was offered free on Amazon.  I do not know the author and I have never had any communication with her about this book or any other matter.  I am an author of historical romances, including Western historical romances.

"Dymond Publishing" has no presence on the Internet, so I'm going to assume that it's a front for an author publishing her own work.  This assumption appears to be supported by the various statements made at the end of the novel, as well as by the evidence of the book itself:  I cannot imagine any legitimate publisher would ever put out a product of this astonishingly poor quality.

1.  Cover art?  Epic fail.  I know it's supposed to be an illustration of a bare-chested cowboy and a woman in a purple dress, but there's just so much about it that's totally wrong.  His hat is at an impossible angle.  His left arm is deformed, and at first his chest looked more like a gigantic breast growing out of her shoulder.  Her torso is anorexically thin.  The whole rendering of the couple is amateurish and ineffective.

2.  Title?  Yes, the cover was a big enough and bold enough failure to override the other epic failure of the title.  I'm quite certain the author intended the title to be "Surrender, Milady" rather than suggest an illness that turned everyone into sniveling cowards, but what I saw was "Surrender Malady," not Surrender, Mi'Lady. 

Apparently none of the author's millions of readers ever suggested that she learn standard English.